Land Rights

Hedge funds 'grabbing land' in Africa

BBC--Hedge funds are behind "land grabs" in Africa to boost their profits in the food and biofuel sectors, a US think-tank says.

US universities in Africa 'land grab'

Guardian UK--Institutions including Harvard and Vanderbilt reportedly use hedge funds to buy land in deals that may force farmers out.

Investor land deals exploiting Africa, report alleges

Reuters--Wealthy U.S. and European investors are accumulating large swaths of African agricultural lands in deals that have little accountability and give them greater control over food supply for the world's poor, according to a report released Wednesday.

Special Investigation Phase One: Understanding Land Investment Deals in Africa

Read more about the Oakland Institute's ground-breaking research, which reveals previously unpublished details about land grabs across Africa.

Indian Firms Sprawling Land Empire in Ethiopia Fails to Ensure Food Security Back Home

Indian firms have a sprawling land empire abroad, especially in Ethiopia, as part of a move encouraged by different governments to safeguard the nation's food supply. But is the policy truly succeeding in helping feed over a billion Indians?

Erratic weather in India repeatedly causes a scare about low food stocks and rising inflation. As agricultural productivity in India has significantly come down, many Indians are looking to Africa, particularly Ethiopia, buying large tracts of agricultural land to safeguard food supply.

‘Win-Win’ Investment in Tanzania?

Over the last decade, as many African countries surf on high levels of growth, the continent has become an increasingly attractive place for private investment. This is especially true in agriculture, as transnational agribusiness giants like Monsanto flock to the continent to take advantage of the growing opportunity for profits. These businesses have sold a story of a ‘win-win’ scenario for farmers – telling the world’s governments that through industrial agriculture farmers can increase their yields and feed hungry people in their countries.

Is Africa's 'Green Revolution' a Mask for a Profit-Led Corporate Bonanza?

Under a scrappy tarpaulin, Siasa Kasanura sits on a plastic chair surrounded by the impeccably organised records of his village. Wedged among the piles of folders and papers, Kasanura, the community chairperson, says he is uncertain he can keep it all in order for much longer.

Trendy but Risky: Questioning Outgrower Schemes in Light of the Agrica Rice Plantation in Tanzania

Contract farming and outgrower schemes are two terms used interchangeably to describe contractual agreements between farmers (outgrowers) and firms (offtakers). In contract farming, the outgrower agrees to provide a pre-determined quantity of a product at a given time and price, meeting the quality standards set by the offtaker. In return, the firm commits to purchasing the product and sometimes supports the production, for instance through the sale or the loan of agricultural inputs (e.g. seeds, fertilizers, pesticides).

Bittersweet Homecoming for Displaced Tamils in Northern Sri Lanka

Gutted homes, poor infrastructure and a heavy military presence cast a long shadow over the future

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