Ethiopia

Ethiopia to Continue Land Grabbing and Forced Resettlement

Millions of acres of Ethiopia’s most fertile lands are being offered to foreign investors, often in long-term leases and at bargain prices. At the same time, through its ‘villagization’ program, the Ethiopian government is forcibly displacing hundreds of thousands of Indigenous Peoples in order to free up their land so the transnational agro-industry can move in and grow foodstuffs and bio-fuels for export.

Aid Agencies Accused of Ignoring Rights Abuses in Ethiopia

Several major aid agencies have been blamed for not addressing rights violations in Ethiopia, including those linked to their programmes in the country. Samuel Loewenberg reports.

The World Bank, the US Agency for International Development (USAID), and the UK's Department for International Development (DFID) have consistently failed to act on allegations of human rights abuses in Ethiopia, including ones that are tied to their aid programmes, according to new reports by Human Rights Watch (HRW) and the Oakland Institute, a California-based think tank.

In Ethiopia, More Land Grabs, More Indigenous People Pushed Out

A journalist's visit to South Omo, where rights groups say police have raped women and otherwise pressured locals to leave an area tagged to become a huge sugar plantation, was quickly curtailed by authorities.

 

A Subtle Engagement: Ethiopia and India

Even as the global economy has suffered from a prolonged crisis, a number of African countries have seen significant growth. Ethiopia stands out among them. With double-digit growth for the last decade, Ethiopians have seen their purchasing power double, from US$ 527 per capita in 2003 to over US$ 1,100 in 2011.Much of this success has come from relationships with new geopolitical giants, including the so-called BRICs nations, Brazil, Russia, India, and China.

Indian Rose Growers Raise Scent of Division in Ethiopia

View slide show

A two-hour drive from the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa takes you to the Wolisso region where Indian multinational Karuturi has a farm spread over 156 hectares (385 acres). Only a fifth of the farm is under cultivation, growing several varieties of rose. This is one of the four farms run by Karuturi.

Ethiopian Development Destroying Lives

In many parts of the world development has become an invisible cloak under which all manner of “state sponsored” atrocities and human rights violations are being committed. Married to growth, development has been (largely) reduced to economic advancement – meaning maximizing Gross National Product (GNP) figures month on month, year on year, and turning over glowing returns to the insatiable global monetary bodies - The World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) and - profit to private investors.

Ethiopian Development Destroying Lives

In many parts of the world development has become an invisible cloak under which all manner of “state sponsored” atrocities and human rights violations are being committed. Married to growth, development has been (largely) reduced to economic advancement – meaning maximizing Gross National Product (GNP) figures month on month, year on year, and turning over glowing returns to the insatiable global monetary bodies – The World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) and – profit to private investors.

Ruraux Ethiopiens Expulsés: Silence Complice

Ces vingt dernières années, l’Ethiopie a émergé en tant que puissance économique montante. Une réalité qui a incité la communauté internationale à injecter des fonds pour développer le pays, et tenter d’ancrer la paix dans une Corne de l’Afrique très instable. Ce soutien, baptisé «Renaissance africaine», s’est traduit par le versement d’environ 3,5 milliards de dollars (3,2 milliards de francs) d’aides annuelles dans les caisses de l’Etat, soit plus de la moitié du budget du pays.

Ethiopia: Lives for Land in Gambella

To many people land is much more than a resource or corporate commodity to be bought developed and sold for a profit. Identity, cultural history and livelihood are all connected to ‘place’. The erosion of traditional values and morality (which include the observation of human rights and environmental responsibility) are some of the many negative effects of the global neo-liberal economic model, with its focus on short-term gain and material benefit.

Human Rights Groups: Donor Countries Fuel Abuse in Ethiopia

LONDON — Two new reports published this month say sustainable development in Ethiopia is impossible without a specific focus on human rights. The reports say donor countries should bear responsibility for ensuring their aid money is not used to fuel abuse.

Ethiopia receives billions of dollars in international aid every year. It is money that is used to help improve basic services like access to health and education.

Pages