Ethiopia

Aiding and Abetting: UK and US Complicity in Ethiopia's Mass Displacement

In the face of evidence, the UK and US continue to deny systematic human rights abuses are occurring in the Lower Omo as thousands are displaced for an irrigation scheme.

The US-based think tank, the Oakland Institute, recently accused the UK and US governments of aiding and abetting the eviction of thousands of people from their land in Ethiopia’s Lower Omo Valley.

Ethiopian Subsistence Farmers Subject to Forced Relocation

Ethiopia boasts one of the strongest economies in Africa. But this comes at a heavy price for the country’s farmers who are being pushed off their land to make way for multinational agribusiness. Anuradha Mittal is executive director of the Oakland Institute. She speaks with Redeye host Lorraine Chisholm.

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No Human Rights = No Development

In a report submitted to the UN Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR) on September 15, 2013, the Oakland Institute and the Housing and Land Rights Network outlined the human rights and international law violations perpetrated by the government of Ethiopia in the name of country’s development strategy.

Aid Agencies Accused of Ignoring Rights Abuses in Ethiopia

The World Bank, the US Agency for International Development (USAID), and the UK's Department for International Development (DFID) have consistently failed to act on allegations of human rights abuses in Ethiopia, including ones that are tied to their aid programmes, according to new reports by Human Rights Watch (HRW) and the Oakland Institute, a California-based think tank.

Ethiopia to Continue Land Grabbing and Forced Resettlement

Millions of acres of Ethiopia’s most fertile lands are being offered to foreign investors, often in long-term leases and at bargain prices. At the same time, through its ‘villagization’ program, the Ethiopian government is forcibly displacing hundreds of thousands of Indigenous Peoples in order to free up their land so the transnational agro-industry can move in and grow foodstuffs and bio-fuels for export.

Aid Agencies Accused of Ignoring Rights Abuses in Ethiopia

Several major aid agencies have been blamed for not addressing rights violations in Ethiopia, including those linked to their programmes in the country. Samuel Loewenberg reports.

The World Bank, the US Agency for International Development (USAID), and the UK's Department for International Development (DFID) have consistently failed to act on allegations of human rights abuses in Ethiopia, including ones that are tied to their aid programmes, according to new reports by Human Rights Watch (HRW) and the Oakland Institute, a California-based think tank.

In Ethiopia, More Land Grabs, More Indigenous People Pushed Out

A journalist's visit to South Omo, where rights groups say police have raped women and otherwise pressured locals to leave an area tagged to become a huge sugar plantation, was quickly curtailed by authorities.

 

A Subtle Engagement: Ethiopia and India

Even as the global economy has suffered from a prolonged crisis, a number of African countries have seen significant growth. Ethiopia stands out among them. With double-digit growth for the last decade, Ethiopians have seen their purchasing power double, from US$ 527 per capita in 2003 to over US$ 1,100 in 2011.Much of this success has come from relationships with new geopolitical giants, including the so-called BRICs nations, Brazil, Russia, India, and China.

Indian Rose Growers Raise Scent of Division in Ethiopia

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A two-hour drive from the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa takes you to the Wolisso region where Indian multinational Karuturi has a farm spread over 156 hectares (385 acres). Only a fifth of the farm is under cultivation, growing several varieties of rose. This is one of the four farms run by Karuturi.

Ethiopian Development Destroying Lives

In many parts of the world development has become an invisible cloak under which all manner of “state sponsored” atrocities and human rights violations are being committed. Married to growth, development has been (largely) reduced to economic advancement – meaning maximizing Gross National Product (GNP) figures month on month, year on year, and turning over glowing returns to the insatiable global monetary bodies - The World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) and - profit to private investors.

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