Dan Rather Reports on AgriSol in Tanzania

View excerpts and the full episode of Dan Rather's reporting on land grabs in Tanzania and interview with the Oakland Institute executive director Anuradha Mittal. 

"As populations expand and food prices hit record highs, international investors are hoping to strike it rich in an unlikely place, Africa. We investigate one controversial deal and the surprising cast of players involved – including one of America’s oldest land grant universities."

Original episode details here.

How Climate Change Efforts by Developed Countries are Hurting Africa’s Rural Poor

In recent years there has been significant movement toward land acquisition in developing countries to establish forestry plantations for offsetting carbon pollution elsewhere in the world. This is often referred to as land grabbing.

These carbon trading initiatives work on the basis that forestry plantations absorb carbon dioxide and other polluting greenhouse gases. This helps to undo the environmental damage associated with modern western lifestyles.

The Growing Case Against the G8’s ‘Responsible Investors’

The multibillion-dollar New Alliance initiative which promises to transform the continent’s food systems is facing rising opposition from African farmers. 

Based in the Morogoro region of Tanzania, Kilombero Plantations Limited (KPL) operates a 5,800 hectare rice plantation and buys produce from local farmers. It has recently become East Africa’s primary rice producer.

Kritikk Av Plantasjedrift Gir Steile Fronter

Den norske støtten til en kjempeplantasje i Kilombero i Tanzania får kritikk i ny rapport. Kritikerne mener det bør satses mer på småbønder enn store plantasjer. – Denne rapporten bidrar til mer polarisering av debatten rundt investeringer i afrikansk landbruk, mener forsker.

I en rapport fra den amerikanske tenketanken Oakland Institute og organisasjonene Greenpeace Africa og Global Justice Now kritiseres risplantasjen Kilombero Plantations Ltd (KPL) i Tanzania. I rapporten hevdes det at:

Q&A: Tanzania's Leading Rice Farmer, KPL, Setting the Pace

CARTER COLEMAN is the Founder and CEO of Kilombero Plantation Limited (KPL), Tanzania’s leading rice producer. The 5,818-hectare farm is located in the Kilombero Valley, 450km from Dar es Salaam. Prior to starting AGRICA, Coleman founded the Tanzanian Forest Conservation Group, a non-profit entity focused on preserving local forests. In the following interview with SKYE LAWRENCE, he says the need for preserving the rainforest from encroaching villages became evident to him during the two years he spent hang-gliding over the mountains -- and training falcons after he first came to Tanzania as a Rotary International Fellow in 1989. The Tanzanian Forest Conservation Group he formed has grown into a large NGO. Excerpts...

The U.K. is Privatizing Aid to the Developing World as Corporations Seek their Cut

In June, the U.K. became the first G7 nation to enshrine into law a 1970 UN target of allocating 0.7% of gross national income to international aid. Although the U.K. only met the target for the first time last year, the new law means that all future British governments are legally obliged to meet it.

Agrica’s Tanzania Rice Scheme Has Devastated Local Farmers, Say NGOs

A flagship rice plantation in Tanzania run by UK investors has allegedly destroyed the livelihoods of local smallholder farmers, driven them into debt and impacted the local environment, according to a new report published by the Oakland Institute. The report was co-authored with Greenpeace Africa and Global Justice Now.

‘Win-Win’ Investment in Tanzania?

Over the last decade, as many African countries surf on high levels of growth, the continent has become an increasingly attractive place for private investment. This is especially true in agriculture, as transnational agribusiness giants like Monsanto flock to the continent to take advantage of the growing opportunity for profits. These businesses have sold a story of a ‘win-win’ scenario for farmers – telling the world’s governments that through industrial agriculture farmers can increase their yields and feed hungry people in their countries.

Is Africa's 'Green Revolution' a Mask for a Profit-Led Corporate Bonanza?

Under a scrappy tarpaulin, Siasa Kasanura sits on a plastic chair surrounded by the impeccably organised records of his village. Wedged among the piles of folders and papers, Kasanura, the community chairperson, says he is uncertain he can keep it all in order for much longer.